Baby Hints & Tips

Opinion: I Officially Need to Apologise to My Friends With Sons

mums of boysSamantha Scott thought gender was irrelevant when people talked about their children, until she experienced the difference for herself…

I didn’t get it. Whether I said it or I just rolled my eyes I seriously didn’t believe the whole ‘oh he’s like that because he’s a boy‘ line. Babies are babies are babies! Each baby is different and sex plays no part at such a young age, I thought. Yes your boy is crawling/walking/running, he’s so energetic and keeping you on your toes. Yes he’s eating everything put in front of him and will eat you out of house and home when he’s older. I just used to nod and disregard the comments. How could a little baby really be that different at such a young age? I just didn’t understand. 

Well boy, (no pun intended) was I wrong! My little dude is just shy of nine months and I can already see what it means to be the mummy of a boy. He’s crawling around like he was born doing it. He is so fast! He is into everything and I mean EVERYTHING. His favourites though are wires, shoes, socks and his sisters puzzle pieces. Try and take any of these away and the house echoes with a resounding high pitched scream. He needs cuddles all the time, is obsessed with breastfeeding and is only interested in food if he can feed himself. He knows what he wants and is not afraid to let us know when he’s not happy. Now there is nothing wrong with these qualities, don’t get me wrong. I am just amazed at the intensity, something I have never experienced with my daughter or indeed witnessed with any other girl.

You know the old adage you are only given what you can handle? Well I definitely think there was a reason I had a girl first, I needed to be eased into this mummy business. This baby boy stuff is serious hard work! The blood, the fearlessness, the thirst for adventure are all so far outside of my realm of norm that it challenges me. I faint at the mere mention of blood, gag at the thought of vomit and crumble at the possibility of my baby being injured. It reminds me of when I was learning to drive, my dad threw me in the deep end with a manual car first go. I tried, I really did but after numerous lessons the instructor turned to me and said “perhaps you better give automatic a go”. Well I am pretty sure had I have had a boy first someone would have turned to me and suggested I master the skill of mummying a girl before I try and tackle a boy.

There is also the other side of boys that I failed to fully appreciate before having my son. The incredible, cute and adventurous side. Their cheeky grins, terminator ability to bounce back from bumps and falls, seemingly superhuman strength, intense fascination with everything and the cuddles, oh the cuddles! All of this from my 9 month old. I can only imagine what I have to look forward to as he grows and further develops his quirky personality.

I now feel so fortunate that I get to experience being a mummy to both a boy and a girl. It’s not something I thought I cared about. Boy or girl both times I didn’t mind, I really didn’t, I just wanted a healthy bub. Maybe that’s because I didn’t fully appreciate the differences a boy and girl can bring. In fact when I would constantly get the ‘oh you’ve got the perfect pigeon pair’ remarks it would really irritate me. I felt gender was so irrelevant it hurt me to think people cared that much. Now though, getting to experience both genders I sort of get it. I actually had no idea just how different the two could be. I can see how my two little munchkins will be completely different but both filled with so much love, laughter and happiness. They are going to take me on some crazy roller coaster rides in such different ways. I can foresee the cuts, bruises and trips to the emergency room with my boy. He is going to be so chilled out, easy going and upfront. My daughter on the other hand is cautious and doesn’t take physical risks but she is a beautiful sensitive soul. Definitely going to give me a run for my money in the emotional department!

Now, seeing both I really get it. Our family is filled with such amazing dynamics. This is probably code for our family being filled with conflicting personalities resulting in volatile situations but where would the fun be without it?

So to all my mummy friends with sons, I am sorry. I am sorry I laughed off your comments about your energy packed little dynamites that left you constantly on the go. I am sorry I dismissed your remarks about continually being on edge waiting to hear the next crash or bang as you let your boy explore and discover things for himself. I am sorry I didn’t take the time to truly appreciate the amazing and different blessing a baby by is.

Are you a mum of boys? Do you think gender makes for different types of children and calls for different types of parenting? Tell us below!

Samantha Scott

About the Author:

Samantha is mummy to 2 gorgeous little kids, a vivacious 3 year old daughter and an energy packed 9 month old son. She's a little bit funny and loves finding the humour in everyday situations. Particularly the ever challenging and rewarding life of a mummy! Check out more of her humours renditions of mummy life over at Wholesome Mummy Life

Share It With Others

Join The Discussion (1 Comments)

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  1. Bec says:

    I have two girls (8 & 6) and one boy (almost 3) with another boy on the way. My girls were and continue to be, by far, much more mentally and physically challenging to deal with than my son. They are just active kids and constantly questioning and exploring everything. And the talking! They don’t stop talking/debating and dissecting information.

    At the same time, I get comments from mums of boys who seem to think having boys makes parenting so much more challenging. It’s a truly arrogant and ignorant attitude. Each child is different. Some boys are quiet, placid and shy, just as some girls are. We need to stop bringing gender into it because we’re only reinforcing ridiculous stereotypes.

X