Tag: Lactation consultant

What guarantees breastfeeding success?

About 95% of mothers want to breastfeed their babies however, by the time their baby is 3 months of age many are mix feeding or have stopped breastfeeding ….so how can women be more informed, more prepared to give themselves the best chance at success?

Grandparents and Breastfeeding support

Are grandparents between a rock and a hard place when a baby arrives? Lynne-McKensey Hall IBCLC explains how they can be involved, without being in the way.

Partners – Can they help with breastfeeding?

Partners are keen to help but may be unsure of how to, especially if the mother is breastfeeding. If either or both the baby’s grandparents are helping with household chores and cooking, partners may feel further displaced about their role while at home. Lynne-McKensey Hall IBCLC provides some tips about how partners can be more involved with your newborn.

Multiple, Pre-term, Adoptive and Surrogate Babies and Relactating

It might surprise you to know that more women can breastfeed than those who are unable to (for whatever reason). We have the ability to produce enough breast milk for one or more babies at one time, adequately provide for a pre-term baby, potentially relactate after weaning and potentially induce lactation as an adoptive or surrogate mother.

Returning to work and breastfeeding

Returning to work isn’t as easy as it used to be when you were coming back from holidays. Now you might need to juggle routines, daycare, breastfeeding and the temperament of a little one who might not particularly like the changes they are being subjected to. Lynne-McKensey Hall IBCLC shares some tips for making the transition easier.

Reasons to express breastmilk

Expressing breastmilk isn’t always easy, with many mums finding they can only express a small amount, or that it takes a long time to get the amount you need. Lynne-McKensey Hall IBCLC shares why expressing may be beneficial, and how you can tackle some of the common issues mums face.

Breastfeeding issues and the unexpected

Breastfeeding is the physiologically normal way to feed and nurture our babies. Without the opportunity to watch and learn at the fireside from our mothers and other women as our ancestors did, it’s understandable that unexpected outcomes and issues with breastfeeding and settling can bewilder many breastfeeding mothers.

Baby’s Arrival – How breastfeeding myths can affect you and your baby

The arrival of your new baby is an exciting and joyous event but it often comes with many people offering advice about breastfeeding. Lynne-McKensey Hall IBCLC explores two common myths about breastfeeding that are often offered as ‘advice’.

I’m on empty! I need more milk!… Or do I?

Expert Tips: Lactation consultant shares tips on how to know if you have low milk supply and how to increase milk supply

Breastfeeding tips

Breastfeeding is natural so it should be easy right? For some women it does come very naturally but for the majority it is a skill that needs to be learned. Not so much by the baby as it is instinctive to them, but by the mother.

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